Diversity & Democracy: Civic Learning for Shared Futures
Diversity Innovations Institutional Leadership and Commitment
Diversity Digest Volume 8, Number 3

Diversity Digest
Volume 8,
Number 3
(2005)

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Curricular Transformation
Shared Futures: Global Learning and Social Responsibility
Recasting Religious Studies at Beloit College
Hybrid Student Identities: A Resource
for Global Learning
Global Education Continuum—
Four Phases
New Global Studies Degree Combines Liberal Arts and Preprofessional Disciplines
Globalizing the Curriculum
Campus-Community Involvement
Student Civic Engagement at Home
and Abroad
Looking Within to See the World
Institutional Leadership
Shared Futures? The Interconnections
of Global and U.S. Diversity
Connecting the Global and the Local: The Experience of Arcadia University
Partnership in Education for a Sustainable Future
Student Experience
Engaging Diversity on the Homogeneous Campus: The Power
of Immersion Experiences
Resources
Crossing Borders: Interdisciplinary Centers and Global Learning
Resources for Shared Futures
Research
The Curricular Disconnect
 

The Curricular Disconnect

The American Council on Education (ACE) conducted three national surveys on international education in 2001 and 2002. The results are analyzed in Mapping internationalization on U.S. Campuses by Laura Siaya and fred M. Hayward (2003). the findings have profound implications for the shared futures initiative. data suggest that “most institutions, regardless, of type, have not internationalized their [overall] curriculum to a great extent” (26) and, the authors write, “little, if any, movement has been made on internationalizing general education requirements” (24).

Figure 9: Student and Faculty Attitudes Toward International Requirements

 

Table 1: Number of International Courses Taken During the 2001–02 Academic Year, by Student Class Level
Number of
International Courses
First-Year Second-Year Third-Year Fourth-Year
None
One
Two
Three or more
51%
23%
18%
8%
50%
22%
17%
10%
49%
18%
18%
16%
43%
23%
20%
14%
Any Courses
49%
50%
52%
57%

 

Figure 15: Number of Courses Required to satisfy an
International General Education Requirement, by Institution Type

 

Figure 16: Percentage of Undergraduate International Courses in Selected Fields,
by Institutional Type

 

Reference

Siaya, Laura, and Fred M. Hayward. 2003. Mapping internationalization on U.S. campuses. Washington, DC: American Council on Education.

Questions, comments, and suggestions regarding Diversity & Democracy should be directed to Kathryn Peltier Campbell at campbell@aacu.org.
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