Diversity & Democracy: Civic Learning for Shared Futures
Diversity Innovations Civic Learning for Shared Futures
Diversity & Democracy Volume 11, Number 1  

Diversity & Democracy
Volume 11,
Number 1
(2008)

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About This Issue
Featured Topic: Shared Futures
Religious Diversity and the Making of Meaning: Implications for the Classroom
Educating Ourselves Into Coexistence
Religious Diversity: Challenges and Opportunities in the College Classroom
Beyond Spirituality: A New Framework for Educators
Speaking of Religion: Facilitating Difficult Dialogues
Perspectives
Finding Theological Support for Religious Diversity
Que(e)rying Religion
Campus Practice
Campus Conversations: Modeling a Diverse Democracy through Deliberative Polling
Promoting Multicultural Excellence in the Academy: A National Summer Institute
Research Report
The Study of Religion in the United States
And More...
In Print
Resources
Opportunities

About This Issue

By Kathryn Peltier Campbell, Editor

Even in a country founded on the principles of religious freedom, open dialogue about religious differences is the source of deep-seated anxiety in college and university classrooms. As faculty, staff, and administrators prepare students to live in a world where religious beliefs profoundly influence global relations, they must enter the deep and uncertain waters of spirituality and religious inquiry. College students need—and often request—guidance about these topics that are inextricable from their personal identity explorations and their preparation for public roles.

This issue of Diversity & Democracy begins to examine the place of religion and spirituality in the American classroom. Our contributors embrace the difficult questions, asking not only whether spirituality belongs in the academic setting, but also how to best educate students for conversation across religious divides. Knowing that belief affects learning across disciplines, from physics to history to political science, our authors provide practical advice to educators wishing to understand this aspect of American diversity and prepare students for citizenship in a religiously pluralistic world.

Questions, comments, and suggestions regarding Diversity & Democracy should be directed to Kathryn Peltier Campbell at campbell@aacu.org.
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