Diversity & Democracy: Civic Learning for Shared Futures
Diversity Innovations Civic Learning for Shared Futures
Diversity & Democracy Volume 11, Number 3  

Diversity & Democracy
Volume 12,
Number 3
(2009)

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About This Issue
Featured Topic: Shared Futures
Teaching Diversity and Democracy across the Disciplines: Who, What, and How
Infusing Diversity in the Sciences and Professional Disciplines
Creating Interdisciplinary and
Global Perspectives through Community-Based Research
Literature, Literacy, and Multiculturalism in the Expanded Classroom
Diversity Content as a Gateway to Deeper Learning
Preparing Globally Competitive, Collaborative, and Compassionate Students
Perspectives
Education in a Mash-up Culture
Campus Practice
Envisioning Interdisciplinarity
Global Design Studio
Research Report
Surveys Suggest Positive Trends Related to Diversity and Civic Education
And More...
In Print
Resources
Opportunities

About This Issue

By Kathryn Peltier Campbell, Editor

Higher education has made great efforts to incorporate diverse content, perspectives, and approaches in the classroom. By questioning canons, considering civic commitments, and following the lure of interdisciplinarity, faculty have shifted pedagogies in promising ways. Yet some faculty members continue to ask, “How can I incorporate diversity into my teaching? How can I globalize my students’ learning? And how can I help my students engage with the multiple communities that constitute their world?”

This issue of Diversity & Democracy continues this legacy and addresses these challenges by showcasing new ideas for integrating diversity work across multiple disciplines. With creative approaches to persistent questions related to U.S. pluralism, global diversity, and civic engagement, this issue’s authors are exploring new ways to prepare students to live in the modern world. Through novel methods of teaching, faculty are encouraging students to develop skills that are essential in a diverse democracy while simultaneously strengthening students’ disciplinary and interdisciplinary learning. Their work suggests pathways toward pedagogies that support student engagement with diversity and learning in all subject areas.

Questions, comments, and suggestions regarding Diversity & Democracy should be directed to Kathryn Peltier Campbell at campbell@aacu.org.
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